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Jane Simoni, Ph.D.

Professor

Interests: Global mental health, HIV/AIDS, LGBT psychology, health disparities, ehealth interventions

Contact

Phone (206) 685-3291
Fax (206) 685-3157
E-mail jsimoni@uw.edu
Website(s) Website

Advising

Do I accept and train new psychology graduate students in general?
Yes
Am I accepting new graduate students in the upcoming year?
I am NOT accepting graduate students in the 2019-2020
Advising Areas:
Adult Clinical
Advising notes:
I will *not* be taking a student for the 2019-2020 school year. In years I am accepting a student, please note that it is not necessary to contact me before submitting your application. Due to the number of queries we receive, I do not communicate with applicants until after the deadline and our initial review. At that point, I will contact those who make our "short list." I am particularly interested in students with interests/expertise in online technology for enhancing mental health across the globe as well as linguistic/cultural expertise for my work on HIV/AIDS in China (in Mandarin) on the US-Mexico Border (in Spanish) and in Haiti (French).

Research

My research interests lie primarily in clinical psychology in the context of global health. I study coping with trauma, chronic illness, and other stressful life events and am particularly interested in whether individuals from historically oppressed or stigmatized groups experience unique stressors or exhibit culturally specific coping processes. Much of my research, therefore, targets ethnic/racial minorities, women, gay men and lesbians, and persons living with HIV. The health disparities and unmet needs in the oppressed communities I study have motivated my efforts to develop and empirically test culturally relevant disease prevention and health promotion interventions. My research has included a randomized control trial to evaluate the effectiveness of peer support and two-way pager messaging to enhance antiretroviral medication adherence among a population of HIV+ clinic patients in Seattle. In Beijing, China, we conducted a nurse-delivered HIV medication adherence intervention for HIV+ outpatients. On the US-Mexico Border, we adapted an intervention to treat depression as a way to improve medication adherence among HIV+ individuals. New work in China is exploring how online/nurse-facilitated/peer interventions can address the needs of newly diagnosed HIV-positive persons, including disclosing their HIV status to their children. In Haiti, we are looking at an electronic medical record alert and a provider intervention to support adherence to HIV medications. With Karina Walters from the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI.org) in the School of Social Work, we have studied stress and coping among urban two-spirit Native Americans in six cities across the U.S. in a major study that employed both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. I have also collaboratied with IWRI on a cardiovascular disease prevention study at the Tulalip Indian Reservation and a computer-based HIV prevention intervention for Native men who have sex with men. I am the Directors of the Behavioral Science Core of UW Center for AIDS Research. Within the Department, I am the Adult Clinical Area Head, provide supervision in our clinic, employing a time-limited interpersonal process approach, and teach the Professional Development Seminar and Minority Mental Health.

Selected Publications

  • Lehavot, K., Molina, Y., & Simoni. J. M. (2012). Childhood trauma, adult sexual assault, and adult gender expression among lesbian and bisexual women. Sex Roles: A Journal of Research. doi:10.1007/s11199-012-0171-1
  • Pearson, C. R., Walters, K. L., Simoni, J. M., Beltran, R., & Nelson, K. M. (2013). A cautionary tale: risk reduction strategies among urban American Indian/Alaska native men who have sex with men. AIDS Education and Prevention, 25(1), 25–37. [PMID 23387949]
  • Simoni, J. M., Montgomery, A., Marin, E., New, M., Demas, P. A., & Rana, S. (2007) Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for pediatric HIV infection: A qualitative systematic review of current research with recommendations for research and clinical management. Pediatrics, 119, e1371-1383.
  • Simoni, J. M., Pantalone, D. W., Plummer, M. D., & Huang, B. (2007) A randomized controlled trial of a peer support intervention targeting antiretroviral adherence and depressive symptomatology among HIV-positive men and women. Health Psychology, 26, 488-495.
  • Starks H., Simoni J. M., Zhao, H., Huang, B., Fredriksen-Goldsen, K., Pearson, C. R., Chen, W.T., Lu, L., & Zhang, F. (2008). Conceptualizing antiretroviral adherence in Beijing, China. AIDS Care, 20, 607-14.
  • Valencia-Garcia, D., Simoni, J. M., Alegría, M., & Takeuchi, D. T. (2012). Social capital, acculturation, and mental health among women of Mexican ancestry. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 80(2), 177–185. [PMCID PMC3314148]
  • Walters, K. L., & Simoni, J. M. (2002). Reconceptualizing Native women_s health: An "indigenist" stress-coping model. <em>American Journal of Public Health, 92,</em> 520-524.

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